When you start seeing your worth, you’ll find it harder to stay around people who don’t.
Worth by Emily S. P.  (via bummedteenager)

Robin Williams didn’t die from suicide. I only just heard the sad, sad news of Robin Williams’s death. My wife sent me a message to tell me he had died, and, when I asked her what he died from, she told me something that nobody in the news seems to be talking about.

When people die from cancer, their cause of death can be various horrible things – seizure, stroke, pneumonia – and when someone dies after battling cancer, and people ask “How did they die?”, you never hear anyone say “pulmonary embolism”, the answer is always “cancer”. A Pulmonary Embolism can be the final cause of death with some cancers, but when a friend of mine died from cancer, he died from cancer. That was it. And when I asked my wife what Robin Williams died from, she, very wisely, replied “Depression”.

The word “suicide” gives many people the impression that “it was his own decision,” or “he chose to die, whereas most people with cancer fight to live.” And, because Depression is still such a misunderstood condition, you can hardly blame people for not really understanding. Just a quick search on Twitter will show how many people have little sympathy for those who commit suicide…

But, just as a Pulmonary Embolism is a fatal symptom of cancer, suicide is a fatal symptom of Depression. Depression is an illness, not a choice of lifestyle. You can’t just “cheer up” with depression, just as you can’t choose not to have cancer. When someone commits suicide as a result of Depression, they die from Depression – an illness that kills millions each year. It is hard to know exactly how many people actually die from Depression each year because the figures and statistics only seem to show how many people die from “suicide” each year (and you don’t necessarily have to suffer Depression to commit suicide, it’s usually just implied). But considering that one person commits suicide every 14 minutes in the US alone, we clearly need to do more to battle this illness, and the stigmas that continue to surround it. Perhaps Depression might lose some its “it was his own fault” stigma, if we start focussing on the illness, rather than the symptom. Robin Williams didn’t die from suicide. He died from Depression*. It wasn’t his choice to suffer that.

Tom Clempsom (via mollyfamous)

FINALLY PEOPLE ARE STARTING TO TALK ABOUT WHAT DEPRESSION REALLY IS.

(via workin9to5)

THIS IS THE BEST THING I HAVE EVER READ

(via namastetoyoutoo)

redefiningbodyimage:

Your Body Is Beautiful And You Are A G o d d e s s 

I appreciate the variety of body types here (unlike many posts of this type it includes lots of WoC), and I LOVE that it ends with Gabby, but I feel like it is important to include some women who aren’t able-bodied in images like this.

-Liz

clarknokent:

findfanficshere:

blasianxbri:

thefuquanator:

buttonpoetry:

Javon Johnson - “cuz he’s black”

This hits me in ways that are unimaginable

So relevant considering the Dunn trial verdict just came out.

This gives me the chills must watch 😔😣😢😥😪😫😩

Too relevant to ignore

vmagazine:

Namibia’s Hipsters: From the sapeurs of Kinshasa, the fashionistas of Lagos and to the streets of Jozi, vintage style is trending in Africa.   

Designer, tailor and stylist Lourens Loux Gebhardt of Loux the Vintage Guru is now collaborating with Khumbala, a group of stylists and designers from Johannesburg, to launch a street-style website that seeks to inspire Africans to step out in style and introduce them to the merits of vintage fashion.

A fashion revolution in the making; “When we collaborate we call ourselves LIA (Love is African), and we’re currently playing a big part by simply inspiring fashionistas around the African continent.”

Usually decked out in well-cut 60’s suits, tweed jackets, round spectacles and trilby hats, Lourens explains, “Many people aren’t interested in wearing vintage, they just see it as used clothing… I manage to dress myself cheaply and end up looking like a million bucks.”

photos: ©Harness Hamese and ©Lukas Amakali. all rights reserved

h/t The Guardian

tonedandtan:

wildeaboutoscar:

imaginedragons:

what real mens activists look like (see more here)

Just so you know, I love all of you.

women don’t owe you shit…my fave

A few months back, I was asked to participate in a debate on the topic of whether men should have to pay on dates. (I was “the feminist.”) It turned out that the male debater and I didn’t really disagree much on that topic. I said that, generally, whoever asks the other person out pays for that date, and then at some point couples generally transition into sharing costs in whatever way works for them. He was actually pretty happy to pay for first dates; he just wanted women to say thank you and to not use him. I had no problem with that.

I think he said that women should offer to pay half, knowing they’ll probably be turned down. I said, well, sometimes — but what if the other person invited you someplace really expensive? What if you agreed to a date with the guy and he spent an hour saying crazy racist shit to you and you felt like you couldn’t escape? This is what led to our real disagreement.

The male debater felt strongly that if a woman wasn’t interested in a second date, she should say so on the spot. If the man says, “Let’s do this again sometime,” the woman shouldn’t say, “Sure, great,” and then back out later. I said that that was a nice ideal, but that he should keep in mind that most women spent most of their lives living in low-level fear of physical aggression from men. I think about avoiding rape (or other violence) every time I walk home from the subway, every time there’s an unexpected knock at the door, and certainly every time I piss off an unhinged man. So, if I were on a date with a man who I felt was unbalanced, creepy, overly aggressive, or possibly violent, and he asked if I wanted to “do this again sometime,” I would say whatever I felt would avoid conflict. And then I would leave, wait awhile, and hope that letting him down politely a few days later would avoid his finding me and turning my skin into an overcoat.

The male debater was furious that I had even brought this up. He felt that the threat of violence against women was irrelevant, and that I was playing some kind of “rape card” as a debate trick. He got angrier and angrier as we argued. I also got angrier and angrier, although I worked hard to keep speaking in a calm and considered way. He was shouting and cutting me off when I tried to speak. I pointed out that the debater himself was displaying exactly the sort of behavior that would make me very uncomfortable on a date. THAT made him livid.

He then called me “passive-aggressive.”

I was genuinely taken aback. “Actually,” I said, “I call this ‘behaving myself.’” It’s a lot of work to stay calm when you’re just as furious as the other person, and that other person is shouting at you. I felt that I was acting like a grownup — at some emotional cost to myself — and I wanted credit, not insults, for being able to speak in a normal tone of voice when I was having to explain things like, “We can’t tell who the rapists are before they turn violent, so sometimes we have to be cautious with men who do not intend to harm us.”

misandry-mermaid:

karenkavett:

"BUT WHAT ABOUT THE MEN?!" - Is Feminism Sexist? by marinashutup

This video should be required watching. Just, for everyone.

Perfection,